Password storage in summary

We discussed the password storage in the article Speaking of passwords…and concluded that password implementation requires a cryptographically strong, contemporary (as in “very, very slow”) one-way hash function with a randomly generated salt for every password.

This is pretty much all you need to take care of. Salting is fairly straight-forward but it is essential to make sure it always works. Achieving a good balance between the slowness of the hashing algorithm for the attacker and an acceptable user performance is just a bit more involved but the things like key stretching techniques have been around for literally ages now too.

It is rumored that Thomas Ptacek once said:

What have we learned? We learned that if it’s 1975, you can set the ARPANet on fire with rainbow table attacks. If it’s 2007, and rainbow table attacks set you on fire, we learned that you should go back to 1975 and wait 30 years before trying to design a password hashing scheme.

We learned that if we had learned anything from this blog post, we should be consulting our friends and neighbors in the security field for help with our password schemes, because nobody is going to find the game-over bugs in our MD5 schemes until after my Mom’s credit card number is being traded out of a curbside stall in Tallinn, Estonia.

We learned that in a password hashing scheme, speed is the enemy. We learned that MD5 was designed for speed. So, we learned that MD5 is the enemy. Also Jeff Atwood and Richard Skrenta.

Finally, we learned that if we want to store passwords securely we have three reasonable options: PHK’s MD5 scheme, Provos-Maziere’s Bcrypt scheme, and SRP. We learned that the correct choice is Bcrypt.

And I think that is a great summary.

One thought on “Password storage in summary

  1. […] previous 20 years never happened in their computer universe. We keep reiterating the good ways of storing passwords over and over again and nobody […]

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