Apple – is it any different?

The article “Password denied: when will Apple get serious about security?” in The Verge talks about Apple’s insecurity and blames Apple’s badly organized security and the absence of any visible security strategy and effort. Moreover, it seems like Apple is not taking security sufficiently seriously even.

“The reality is that the Apple way values usability over all else, including security,” Echoworx’s Robby Gulri told Ars.

MoneyIt is good that Apple gets a bit of bashing but are they really all that different? If you look around and read about all other companies you quickly realize it is not just Apple, it is a common, too common, problem: most companies do not take security seriously. And they have a good reason: security investment cannot be justified in short-term, it cannot be sold, and it cannot be turned into bonuses and raises for the management. And the risks are typically ignored as I already talked about previously.

So in this respect Apple simply follows in the footsteps of all other software companies out there. They invest in features, in customer experience, in brand management but they ignore the security. Even the recent scandal with Mat Honan’s life wipe-out that got a lot of publicity did not change much if anything. The company did not suffer sufficient damage to start thinking of security seriously. The damage was done to a private individual and did not translate into any impact on sales. So it demonstrated once again that security problems do not damage the bottom line. Why else would a company care?

We need the damage done to external parties to be internalized and absorbed by the companies. As long as it stays external they will not care. The same thing exactly as the ecology – ecological cost is external to the company so it would not care unless there is regulation that makes those costs internal. We need a mechanism for internalizing the security costs.

Brainwashing in security

At first, when I read the article titled Software Security Programs May Not Be Worth the Investment for Many Companies I thought it was a joke or a prank. But then I had a feeling it was not. And it was not the 1st of April. And it seems to be a record of events at the RSA Conference. Bloody hell, that guy, John Viega from SilverSky, “an authority on software security”, is speaking in earnest.

That’s one of those people who are continuously making the state of security as miserable as it is today. His propaganda is simple: do not invest into security, it is a total waste of money.

“For most companies it’s going to be far cheaper and serve their customers a lot better if they don’t do anything [about security bugs] until something happens. You’re better off waiting for the market to pressure on you to do it.”

And following the suit was the head of security at Adobe, Brad Arkin, can you believe it? I am not surprised now we have to use things like NoScript to make sure their products do not execute in our browsers. I have a pretty good guess what Adobe and SilverSky are doing: they are covering their asses. They do the minimum required to make sure they cannot be easily sued for negligence and deliberately exposing their customers. But they do not care about you and me, they do not give a damn if their software is full of holes. And they do not deserve to be called anything that has a word ‘security’ in it.

The stuff Brad Arkin is pushing at you flies into the face of the very security best practices we swear by:

“If you’re fixing every little bug, you’re wasting the time you could’ve used to mitigate whole classes of bugs,” he said. “Manual code review is a waste of time. If you think you’re going to make your product better by having a lot of eyeballs look at a lot of code, that’s the worst use of human labor.”

No, sir, you are bullshitting us. Your company does not want to spend the money on security. Your company is greedy. Your company wants to get money from the customers for the software full of bugs and holes. You know this and you are deliberately telling lies to deceive not only the customers but even people who know a thing or two about security. But we have seen this before already and no mistake.

 

The problem is, many small companies will believe anything that is pronounced at an event like the RSA Conference and take it for granted that this is the ultimate last word in security. And that will make the security state of things even worse. We will have more of those soft underbelly products and companies that practice “security by ignorance”. And we do not want that.

The effect of security bugs can be devastating. The normal human brain is not capable of properly estimating the risks of large magnitude but rare occurrence and tends to downplay them. That’s why the risk of large security problems that can bring a company to its knees is usually discarded. But security problems can be so severe that they will put even a large company out of business, not to mention that a small company would not survive any slightly more than average impact security problem at all.

So, thanks, but no, thanks. Security is a dangerous field, it is commonly compared to a battlefield and there is some truth in that. Stop being greedy and make sure your software does not blow up.

Car software security

I stumbled across an article on car software viruses. I did not see anything unexpected really. The experts “hope” to get it all fixed before the word gets out and things start getting messy. Which tells us that things are in a pretty bad shape right now. The funny thing is though that the academic group that did the research into vehicle software security was disbanded after working for two years and publishing a couple of damning papers, demonstrating that “the virus can simultaneously shut off the car’s lights, lock its doors, kill the engine and release or slam on the brakes.” An interesting side note is that the car’s system is available to “remotely eavesdrop on conversations inside cars, a technique that could be of use to corporate and government spies.” This goes in stark contrast to what car manufactures are willing to disclose: “I won’t say it’s impossible to hack, but it’s pretty close,” said Toyota spokesman John Hanson. Basically, all you can hope for is that they are “working hard to develop specifications which will reduce that risk in the vehicle area.” I don’t know, mate, I think I better stay with the good old trustworthy mechanic stuff. I guess I know too much about software security for my own good. I kinda feel they will be inevitably hacked. Scared? If there is a manual override for everything – not so much but… The second-hand car market suddenly starts looking very appealing by comparison…

Google on privacy

Google 貼牌冰箱(Google Refrigerator)

Google has been fined $22.5 million for breaching its privacy commitment and bypassing Apple’s Safari users security settings. As the article in Mercury News comments, citing Consumer Watchdog, “the commission has allowed Google to buy its way out of trouble for an amount that probably is less than the company spends on lunches for its employees and with no admission it did anything wrong.”

The days of when the motto of Google “do no harm” could be taken literally are long gone. Beware.

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