Windows 10: catching up to Google?

windows-10-is-spying-on-every-user-but-theres-a-way-outWindows 10 has turned out to be a very interesting update to the popular desktop operating system. Apparently, Microsoft envies Google for their success in spying on everyone and their dog through the Internet. Accordingly, Microsoft could not resist turning Windows into a mean spying machine. People were mightily surprised when all of the new spying features of Windows started to get uncovered.

To start with, the EULA, the license agreement, actually states clearly that Microsoft will collect the history of browsing, WiFi access point names and passwords, and website passwords. All of this information will be stored in the “user’s” Microsoft account, i.e. on the servers of Microsoft. Every user will receive a unique identification number that will be available to third parties for targeted advertisement.

When you use BitLocker for disk encryption, the key will be also stored at Microsoft! The license agreement states that the password will be copied automatically to OneDrive servers. I told you that going with BitLocker was not something a sane person would do, didn’t I?

And now all of that personal data can be used by Microsoft at will:

We will access, disclose and preserve personal data, including your content (such as the content of your emails, other private communications or files in private folders), when we have a good faith belief that doing so is necessary to protect our customers or enforce the terms governing the use of the services.

See, it’s not just in case that a court issues an order, but simply whenever Microsoft thinks that they need to.

Some observers report that the license also reserves the rights for Microsoft to disconnect “unlicensed hardware”. I did not find that part in the EULA though, I don’t know if it is true. I found something else though. Windows 10 will also remove your anti-virus or other anti-malware protection: “other antimalware software will be disabled or may have to be removed”.

That’s the part about EULA. There is also Cortana, the virtual assistant, and various parts of the OS that submit various information to Microsoft. Well, Cortana can be disabled. However, it turns out that even disabling every single thing that reports user information to Microsoft does not help – Windows 10 still reports a lot of things, now without even informing the user. Apparently, the user cannot switch off all of the monitoring.

One of the things that cannot be switched off is a built-in keylogger. The keystrokes are recorded in a temporary file and then submitted to Microsoft servers. Keylogger is active even when you are not logged into the Microsoft account.

Another thing is the microphone and camera. Whenever the microphone is on, it records the sound and transmits it to the servers of the company. The same happens to the video camera, the video is recorded automatically and the first 35 MB are sent over to Microsoft.

Microsoft explains that all of this is necessary to create a database of users, so that the targeted advertisement can be sold to third parties. However, these are obvious privacy violations and some of them are even performed without informing the user.

Microsoft has also announced that some of the features of the Windows 10 will be backported to the previous versions of Windows. So we can expect soon the updates for previous versions that will introduce these spying features across all of Windows computers.

Facebook “joins” Tor – good-bye, privacy!

Multiple publications are touting the announcement by Facebook of a Tor-enabled version of the social networking website as nothing short of a breakthrough for anonymous access from “repressed nations”. They think that the people around the world who wish their identity and activity online to remain hidden will now have a great time of using Facebook through Tor.

In my point of view, the result is just the opposite. The users of Facebook sign in and are tracked across a multitude of collaborating sites. Using Facebook through Tor will actually disclose completely the identity and the activity of the person using it. This information will become available across several user-tracking websites. The user will completely lose the anonymity they so strongly desired.

Mozilla Firefox Lightroom-578-80
Lightbeam for Firefox shows tracking of the user through different websites and tracking networks and how they share information with each other.

Facebook previously denied access to its social network through the Tor network citing security concerns. Surely, you do not think they decided to provide Tor access because they decided to be nice to those few who use Tor? Facebook is a commercial company under control of United States government and don’t you forget it. The move to bring in a few thousand Tor users is unlikely to have any positive impact on their business but will require to provide additional infrastructure. Therefore, Facebook is acting selflessly and causing themselves trouble for no commercial gain. I view such a move as extremely suspicious. Most likely, the company’s network will be used in online operations to unmask the identity of Tor users.

Of course, the proper way to keep your privacy online is to never use any social networks of any kind and discard every session after a short period and when switching activities. Searching for movie tickets? Use a session and discard it when done. Looking up the hospital’s admission hours? Discard when done. In any other case, the network of tracking sites will connect the dots on you. If you are to use the Facebook in the same session, your identity is revealed instantly and all of that activity will be linked to the real you.

We released too much of our privacy to the Internet companies already. They are now slowly dismantling the last bastions, one of which is the Tor network, under the pretense of fighting online crime. Facebook, having a history of abusing its customers, should not be trusted on these matters. Their interest is not in protecting your privacy, they will betray you for money, rest assured.

Can I interest you in more security, sir?

nsa-eagle-200x197The last week’s meeting of the IETF discussed security of the Internet and the recent revelations that the NSA turned the Internet into a giant surveillance machine. While the sentiment was clear that the Internet should not allow itself to such abuse, there is little evidence that anything at all could be done about it.

The problem is not that it is technically impossible to introduce more encryption and build better protocols. The problem is that it is not in the current interest of the companies to do so. The Internet was conceived for use in academia, so it was not a commercial thing from the start. The principles on which it is built are idealistic. But it is commercial from the hardware to the applications, through and through now. And it is not in any company’s commercial interest to introduce better security. It is quite the opposite, in fact: most companies are interested in less security even if they claim otherwise.

Me and you, as people, as independent human beings, can introduce better security because it is in our interest. I would not rely on companies to do so.

User Data Manifesto

Having a confirmation that the governments spy on people on the Internet and have access to the private data they should not sparked some interesting initiatives. One of such interesting initiatives is the User Data Manifesto:

1. Own the data
The data that someone directly or indirectly creates belongs to the person who created it.

2. Know where the data is stored
Everybody should be able to know: where their personal data is physically stored, how long, on which server, in what country, and what laws apply.

3. Choose the storage location
Everybody should always be able to migrate their personal data to a different provider, server or their own machine at any time without being locked in to a specific vendor.

4. Control access
Everybody should be able to know, choose and control who has access to their own data to see or modify it.

5. Choose the conditions
If someone chooses to share their own data, then the owner of the data selects the sharing license and conditions.

6. Invulnerability of data
Everybody should be able to protect their own data against surveillance and to federate their own data for backups to prevent data loss or for any other reason.

7. Use it optimally
Everybody should be able to access and use their own data at all times with any device they choose and in the most convenient and easiest way for them.

8. Server software transparency
Server software should be free and open source software so that the source code of the software can be inspected to confirm that it works as specified.

In the news

I do not often want to comment the news so today is a special day.

The first piece is an article on the popular subject of NSA Web Surveillance quoting some well-known people starts off on a good direction but gets derailed somehow into recommending obscurity for security. Strange as it is we really should consider anonymizing our access to the Internet. The problem is though that we cannot anonymize the most important part of our Internet access where we real need our real identity and that is the part that delivers most information about us. Sorry, it is not going to work.

I was wondering earlier what the situation of Canada is in relation to the NSA scandal and the article on Canada’s part in NSA plan revealed that we cannot count on Canada to be impartial in the matter. They are in on it and quite likely Blackberry is no better choice than other U.S. controlled mobile phones.

I cannot remember when was the first time I heard that “passwords are dead”, it must have been years and years ago but this same mantra is repeated over and over again every year. Now the passwords are dead at Google. Well, tell you what, long live passwords!

And suddenly Vint Cerf, one of the guys at the beginnings of the Internet, is preaching for the devil. He is working for Google, of course, so his opinion that we all should “give up a degree of privacy in order to be protected” is likely Google’s, not his own. On the other hand, if you ask me I would say he should watch what he says, people believe him more or less unconditionally and his moral obligation is to not peddle the loss of privacy for all of us.

Here you go. I seem to disagree with nearly all of the news today. Which is good news!

Nokia is gone. So is mobile security.

The recent acquisition of Nokia by Microsoft stirred up investors and Nokia fans. But, the question goes, what does it have to do with security? (Not) Surprisingly, a lot.

Working in security makes people slightly paranoid over time, that is a fact. On the one hand, without being suspicious of everything and checking all strangeness you would not get far, so that makes you extra attentive to possible security issues. On the other hand, witnessing how everything around us turns from impenetrable walls into a Swiss cheese variety when poked makes you doubt every security statement on the planet. Looking at Microsoft buying Nokia, I cannot resist putting my security hat on.

So what does the acquisition of Nokia by Microsoft bring us on a large scale of things? You remember, of course, that some governments, and in particular USA, listen to all our conversations on the Internet and collect all possible information about us, right? Okay, for those who forgot, I will remind that Microsoft, Google and Apple are on the list of companies sharing information with NSA. Just keep in mind it is likely not limited to NSA and USA, other governments are not likely to refuse the temptation.

lock-nokia-transpNokia was not on the list. And I will hazard a guess that the Finnish company refused cooperation with NSA. That means people who have the good old Nokia phones are probably more safe from surveillance compared to people with those Microsoft, Google and Apple phones. We can probably assume that it was not exciting for NSA and the like to know that (5 years ago) half of the people with mobile phones will not be under surveillance. I can imagine they were rather disappointed. I would not be surprised if they lent a hand to Microsoft in the plan to acquire Nokia or even orchestrated the whole thing.

Now, Nokia is Microsoft. What does it mean? There is no phone any longer that is not under surveillance. Think of any mobile phone, it is going to be Microsoft, Google or Apple, committed to collaborating with NSA on surveillance. There is no alternative.

We still can use our good old mobile phones, of course (and I do). Telephone networks change though, new protocols come into play, old ones are phased out. In time, the good old phones will simply stop working. And this process can be accelerated if desired. There will be no choice.

I really wonder about Blackberry now …

Ignoring security is not a good idea…

 

HTC One X @ MWC 2012I see that HTC got finally whacked over the head for the lack of security in their Android smartphones. I will have to contain myself here and will leave aside the inherent issues surrounding Android, its security and model of operation that will hurt … Ok, ok, I stop now. So, HTC got dragged into a court in US for improper implementation of software that allows remote attackers to steal various data from your smartphone. Big news. Problem is they settled and are not likely to actually do something about it. Anyway, that’s not interesting.

The interesting thing is that the regulators complained that HTC did not provide security training to the staff and did not perform adequate security testing:

The regulator said in a statement that HTC America “failed to provide its engineering staff with adequate security training, failed to review or test the software on its mobile devices for potential security vulnerabilities (and) failed to follow well-known and commonly accepted secure coding practices.”

Most companies ignore security hoping that the problem never comes. This shortsighted view is so widespread I feel like Captain Obvious by repeatedly talking about it. But I suppose it bears repeating. The security risks are usually discarded because they are of low probability. However, their impact is usually undervalued and the resulting risk analysis is not quite what it should be. The security problems prevalent in software are usually of such magnitude that they can easily cost even a large business dearly.

Ignoring security is not a good idea. This is like ignoring a possibility of human death by being trapped in an elevator for an elevator company. An elevator company will do all it can to prevent even a remote chance of this happening because if something like that happens they can be easily out of business in no time. Quite the same approach should be taken for granted by software companies, and the sooner, the better. A security problem can put a company out of business. Be forewarned.

Google on privacy

Google 貼牌冰箱(Google Refrigerator)

Google has been fined $22.5 million for breaching its privacy commitment and bypassing Apple’s Safari users security settings. As the article in Mercury News comments, citing Consumer Watchdog, “the commission has allowed Google to buy its way out of trouble for an amount that probably is less than the company spends on lunches for its employees and with no admission it did anything wrong.”

The days of when the motto of Google “do no harm” could be taken literally are long gone. Beware.