Don’t patch it, it’s fine?

I wrote back in 2013 about my shock at discovering that the companies are now publicly calling to stop the investment in security and avoid fixing security bugs in my article Brainwashing in security. There, we witnessed the head of Adobe security, Brad Arkin, tell us that the companies should not be wasting their precious resources on “fixing every little bug”, agreeing to the comment made by another participant, John Viega from SilverSky, that:

“For most companies it’s going to be far cheaper and serve their customers a lot better if they don’t do anything [about security bugs] until something happens.”

All right, fast forward three years and Adobe becomes a showcase. Here is what Google senior security engineer Darren Bilby, speaking at the Kiwicon, has to tell us about the security of the contemporary software:

“We are giving people systems that are not safe for the internet and we are blaming the user,” Bilby says.

He illustrated his point by referring to the 314 remote code execution holes disclosed in Adobe Flash last year alone, saying the strategy to patch those holes is like a car yard which sells vehicles that catch on fire every other week.

The security strategy at Adobe is clearly paying its dividends. Way to go, Adobe, way to go…

 

About the so-called “uncertainty principle of new technology”

It has been stated that the new technology possesses an inherent characteristic that makes it hard to secure. This characteristic is articulated by David Collingridge in what many would like to see accepted axiomatically and even call it the “Collingridge Dilemma” to underscore its immutability:

That, when a technology is new (and therefore its spread can be controlled), it is extremely hard to predict its negative consequences, and by the time one can figure those out, it’s too costly in every way to do much about it.

This is important for us because this may mean that any and all efforts we do on securing our systems are bound to fail. Is that really so? Now, this statement has all of the appearance to sound true but there are two problems with it.

First, it is subject to the very same principle. This is a new statement that we do not quite understand. We do not understand if it is true and we do not understand what the consequences are either way. By the time we understand whether it is true or false it will be deeply engraved in our development and security culture and it will be very hard to get rid of. So even if it was useful, one would be well advised to exercise extreme caution.

Second, the proposed dilemma is only true under a certain set of circumstances. Namely, when the scientists and engineers develop a new technology looking only at the internal structure of the technology itself without any relation to the world, the form, and the quality. Admittedly, this is what happens most of the time in academia but it does not make it right.

When one looks only at the sum of parts and their structure within a system, let’s say, one can observe that parts could be exchanged, modified and combined in numerous ways often leading to something that has potential to work. This way, the new technologies and things can be invented indefinitely. Are they useful to the society, the world and the life as we know it? Where is the guiding principle that tells us what to invent and what – not? Taken this way, the whole process of scientific discovery loses its point.

The scientific discovery is guided by the underlying quality of life that guides it and shapes its progress. The society influences what has to be invented, whether we like it or not. We must not take for granted that we are always going the right way though. Sometimes, the scientists should stand up for fundamental principles of quality over the quantity of inventions and fight for the technology that would in turn steer the society towards better and more harmonious life.

Should the technology be developed with utmost attention to the quality that it originates from, should the products be built with the quality of life foremost in the mind, this discussion would become pointless and the academic dilemma would not exist. Everything that is built from the quality first remains such forever and does not require all this endless tweaking and patching.

We can base our inventions and our engineering on principles different than those peddled to us by the current academia and industry. We can re-base the society to take the quality first and foremost. We can create technologically sound systems that will be secure. We just have to forgo this practicality, the rationality that guides everything now even to the detriment of life itself and concentrate on the quality instead. Call it “Zenkoff Principle”.

The beauty and harmony of proper engineering have been buried in our industry under the pressure of rationality and the rush of delivery but we would do better to re-discover it than to patch it with pointless and harmful excuses.

st-petersburg-open-bridge

P.S. Perhaps I should have written “quality” with a capital “Q” all over because it is not in the sense of “quality assurance” that I use the term but the inherent quality of everything called “arete” by Greeks that originates both form and substance of the new inventions.

Facebook “joins” Tor – good-bye, privacy!

Multiple publications are touting the announcement by Facebook of a Tor-enabled version of the social networking website as nothing short of a breakthrough for anonymous access from “repressed nations”. They think that the people around the world who wish their identity and activity online to remain hidden will now have a great time of using Facebook through Tor.

In my point of view, the result is just the opposite. The users of Facebook sign in and are tracked across a multitude of collaborating sites. Using Facebook through Tor will actually disclose completely the identity and the activity of the person using it. This information will become available across several user-tracking websites. The user will completely lose the anonymity they so strongly desired.

Mozilla Firefox Lightroom-578-80
Lightbeam for Firefox shows tracking of the user through different websites and tracking networks and how they share information with each other.

Facebook previously denied access to its social network through the Tor network citing security concerns. Surely, you do not think they decided to provide Tor access because they decided to be nice to those few who use Tor? Facebook is a commercial company under control of United States government and don’t you forget it. The move to bring in a few thousand Tor users is unlikely to have any positive impact on their business but will require to provide additional infrastructure. Therefore, Facebook is acting selflessly and causing themselves trouble for no commercial gain. I view such a move as extremely suspicious. Most likely, the company’s network will be used in online operations to unmask the identity of Tor users.

Of course, the proper way to keep your privacy online is to never use any social networks of any kind and discard every session after a short period and when switching activities. Searching for movie tickets? Use a session and discard it when done. Looking up the hospital’s admission hours? Discard when done. In any other case, the network of tracking sites will connect the dots on you. If you are to use the Facebook in the same session, your identity is revealed instantly and all of that activity will be linked to the real you.

We released too much of our privacy to the Internet companies already. They are now slowly dismantling the last bastions, one of which is the Tor network, under the pretense of fighting online crime. Facebook, having a history of abusing its customers, should not be trusted on these matters. Their interest is not in protecting your privacy, they will betray you for money, rest assured.

TrueCrypt disappears

truecryptQuite abruptly, the TrueCrypt disk encryption tool is no more. The announcement says that the tool is no longer secure and should not be used. The website provides a heavily modified version of TrueCrypt (7.2) that allows one to decrypt the data and export it from a TrueCrypt volume.

Many questions are asked around what actually happened and why, the speculation is rampant. Unfortunately, there does not seem to be any explanation forthcoming from the developers. For the moment, it is best to assume the worst.

My advice would be to not download the latest version, 7.2. Stick to whatever version you are using now if you are using TrueCrypt at all and look for alternatives (although I do not know any other cross-platform portable storage container tools). If you are with 7.1a, the version is still undergoing an independent audit and you may be well advised to wait for the final results.

More on the subject:

Update: there is a Swiss website trucrypt.ch that promises to keep TrueCrypt alive. At the moment, most importantly, they have the full collection of versions of TrueCrypt and all of the source code. There will probably be a fork of TrueCrypt later on.