Brainwashing in security

At first, when I read the article titled Software Security Programs May Not Be Worth the Investment for Many Companies I thought it was a joke or a prank. But then I had a feeling it was not. And it was not the 1st of April. And it seems to be a record of events at the RSA Conference. Bloody hell, that guy, John Viega from SilverSky, “an authority on software security”, is speaking in earnest.

That’s one of those people who are continuously making the state of security as miserable as it is today. His propaganda is simple: do not invest into security, it is a total waste of money.

“For most companies it’s going to be far cheaper and serve their customers a lot better if they don’t do anything [about security bugs] until something happens. You’re better off waiting for the market to pressure on you to do it.”

And following the suit was the head of security at Adobe, Brad Arkin, can you believe it? I am not surprised now we have to use things like NoScript to make sure their products do not execute in our browsers. I have a pretty good guess what Adobe and SilverSky are doing: they are covering their asses. They do the minimum required to make sure they cannot be easily sued for negligence and deliberately exposing their customers. But they do not care about you and me, they do not give a damn if their software is full of holes. And they do not deserve to be called anything that has a word ‘security’ in it.

The stuff Brad Arkin is pushing at you flies into the face of the very security best practices we swear by:

“If you’re fixing every little bug, you’re wasting the time you could’ve used to mitigate whole classes of bugs,” he said. “Manual code review is a waste of time. If you think you’re going to make your product better by having a lot of eyeballs look at a lot of code, that’s the worst use of human labor.”

No, sir, you are bullshitting us. Your company does not want to spend the money on security. Your company is greedy. Your company wants to get money from the customers for the software full of bugs and holes. You know this and you are deliberately telling lies to deceive not only the customers but even people who know a thing or two about security. But we have seen this before already and no mistake.

 

The problem is, many small companies will believe anything that is pronounced at an event like the RSA Conference and take it for granted that this is the ultimate last word in security. And that will make the security state of things even worse. We will have more of those soft underbelly products and companies that practice “security by ignorance”. And we do not want that.

The effect of security bugs can be devastating. The normal human brain is not capable of properly estimating the risks of large magnitude but rare occurrence and tends to downplay them. That’s why the risk of large security problems that can bring a company to its knees is usually discarded. But security problems can be so severe that they will put even a large company out of business, not to mention that a small company would not survive any slightly more than average impact security problem at all.

So, thanks, but no, thanks. Security is a dangerous field, it is commonly compared to a battlefield and there is some truth in that. Stop being greedy and make sure your software does not blow up.

Ignoring security is not a good idea…

 

HTC One X @ MWC 2012I see that HTC got finally whacked over the head for the lack of security in their Android smartphones. I will have to contain myself here and will leave aside the inherent issues surrounding Android, its security and model of operation that will hurt … Ok, ok, I stop now. So, HTC got dragged into a court in US for improper implementation of software that allows remote attackers to steal various data from your smartphone. Big news. Problem is they settled and are not likely to actually do something about it. Anyway, that’s not interesting.

The interesting thing is that the regulators complained that HTC did not provide security training to the staff and did not perform adequate security testing:

The regulator said in a statement that HTC America “failed to provide its engineering staff with adequate security training, failed to review or test the software on its mobile devices for potential security vulnerabilities (and) failed to follow well-known and commonly accepted secure coding practices.”

Most companies ignore security hoping that the problem never comes. This shortsighted view is so widespread I feel like Captain Obvious by repeatedly talking about it. But I suppose it bears repeating. The security risks are usually discarded because they are of low probability. However, their impact is usually undervalued and the resulting risk analysis is not quite what it should be. The security problems prevalent in software are usually of such magnitude that they can easily cost even a large business dearly.

Ignoring security is not a good idea. This is like ignoring a possibility of human death by being trapped in an elevator for an elevator company. An elevator company will do all it can to prevent even a remote chance of this happening because if something like that happens they can be easily out of business in no time. Quite the same approach should be taken for granted by software companies, and the sooner, the better. A security problem can put a company out of business. Be forewarned.

The art of unexpected

Expecting the unexpected?I am reading through the report of a Google vulnerability on The Reg and laughing. This is a wonderful demonstration of what the attackers do to your systems – they apply the unexpected. The story is always the same. When we build a system, we try to foresee the ways in which it will be used. Then the attackers come and use it in a still unexpected way. So the whole security field can be seen as an attempt to expand the expected and narrow down the unexpected. Strangely, the unexpected is always getting bigger though. And, conversely, the art of being an attacker is an art of unexpected, shrugging off the conventions and expectations and moving into the unknown.

Our task then is to do the impossible, to protect the systems from unexpected and, largely, unexpectable. We do it in a variety of ways but we have to remember that we are on the losing side of the battle, always. There is simply no way to turn all unexpected into expected. So this is the zen of security: protect the unprotectable, expect the unexpectable and keep doing it in spite of the odds.

SAMATE Reference Dataset

Through the  news we can become alerted to many interesting things and one of the recent useful bits is the SAMATE Reference Dataset built by NIST Software Assurance Metrics And Tool Evaluation project. Should you need information on common vulnerabilities test cases, the database has more than 80,000 test cases by now.

From the project website:samate

The purpose of the SAMATE Reference Dataset (SRD) is to provide users, researchers, and software security assurance tool developers with a set of known security flaws. This will allow end users to evaluate tools and tool developers to test their methods. These test cases are designs, source code, binaries, etc., i.e. from all the phases of the software life cycle. The dataset includes “wild” (production), “synthetic” (written to test or generated), and “academic” (from students) test cases. This database will also contain real software application with known bugs and vulnerabilities. The dataset intends to encompass a wide variety of possible vulnerabilities, languages, platforms, and compilers. The dataset is anticipated to become a large-scale effort, gathering test cases from many contributors

Isn’t it good when you do not need to reinvent the wheel?

On the utility of technical security

It is often said that the system is only as strong as the weakest link. When you have good security and strong passwords, the weakest link will be the human. As has always been. Think of how the system can be recovered from a breach when the problem is not technical but human.

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