Getting revenue on security?

I am looking now into arguably the hardest problem of security: how to make it pay off. Security is usually seen as a risk management tool, where increasing security investment lowers the risk of costly disasters. But the trade off between security and risk is hard to evaluate and there is a bias for ignoring the rare risks.

We keep talking about costs, if you noticed. We lower costs, even not actual costs, but potential costs, and we do not increase the revenues here.

For example, when we talk about some product we can look at improvements that would get us more of the following to improve the bottom line:

  1. Acquisition – getting more users or clients
  2. Activation – getting the users or clients to make a purchase
  3. Activity – getting your users or clients to come back for more

Can security demonstrate similar improvements? To move from cost cutting to revenue generation? Share your opinion, please!

Security training – does it help?

I came across the suggestion to train (nearly) everyone in the organization in security subjects. The idea is very good, we often have this problem that the management has absolutely no knowledge or interest in security and therefore ignores the subject despite the efforts of the security experts in the company. Developers, quality, documentation, product management – they all need to be aware of the seriousness of software security for the company and recognize that sometimes the security must be given priority.

But will it help? I have spent a lot of time educating developers and managers on security. My experience is that it does not help most people. Some people get interested and involved – those are naturally inclined to take good care of all aspects of their products, including but not limited to security. Most people do not care for real. They are not interested in security, they are there to do a job and get paid. And nobody gets paid for more security.

That results repeatedly in the situations like the one described in the article:

“If internal security teams seem overly draconian in an organization, the problem may not be with the security team, but rather a lack of security and risk awareness throughout the organization.”

Unfortunately, simply informative security training is not going to change that. People tend to ignore rare risks and that is what happens to security of product development. What we need is not a security awareness course but a way to “hook” people on security, a way to make them understand, deep inside, that the security is important, not in an abstract way, but personally, to them personally. Then security will work. How do we do that?

Car software security

I stumbled across an article on car software viruses. I did not see anything unexpected really. The experts “hope” to get it all fixed before the word gets out and things start getting messy. Which tells us that things are in a pretty bad shape right now. The funny thing is though that the academic group that did the research into vehicle software security was disbanded after working for two years and publishing a couple of damning papers, demonstrating that “the virus can simultaneously shut off the car’s lights, lock its doors, kill the engine and release or slam on the brakes.” An interesting side note is that the car’s system is available to “remotely eavesdrop on conversations inside cars, a technique that could be of use to corporate and government spies.” This goes in stark contrast to what car manufactures are willing to disclose: “I won’t say it’s impossible to hack, but it’s pretty close,” said Toyota spokesman John Hanson. Basically, all you can hope for is that they are “working hard to develop specifications which will reduce that risk in the vehicle area.” I don’t know, mate, I think I better stay with the good old trustworthy mechanic stuff. I guess I know too much about software security for my own good. I kinda feel they will be inevitably hacked. Scared? If there is a manual override for everything – not so much but… The second-hand car market suddenly starts looking very appealing by comparison…